Sep 18 2014

Shopping Blog Post

Published by under The Shopping Blog

For my second shopping blog contribution, I’ve decided to talk about the razor I own: the Gillette Fusion Pro-Glide. It may seem somewhat corny to do a shopping blog post about a razor, but I remembered the idea being thrown out when we first discussed publishing the shopping blog posts. With that idea in mind, I realized a few aspects of Susan Strasser’s work were demonstrated with the Gillette example. For instance, Gillette seems to have a monopoly on non-disposable razors. Also, the advertising tactics of Gillette show that they are well aware of this fact. I would be willing to bet if asked, most people wouldn’t be able to name more than one brand of high-end razors other than Gillette. At least for male consumers.

The advertisement above is pretty common to see on TV.

Obviously, this product is fairly straightforward, and not nearly as interesting as my previous item. However, it does provide a pretty decent clean shave. I’m not a particularly beard-prone person, but I’ve used it at least every other day since I’ve gotten it. It runs for between $13.99-$14.99, so its a fairly affordable product considering the only real maintenance you may need would be to replace the batteries once they run out and clean it. If it were to completely break, replacing it by simply buying a new one is not that bad an option. That’s the benefit of manufacturing a good that is not terribly expensive and has decent longevity; it isn’t economically unbearable to replace. I bought it at the Commissary- the military supermarket that you can find on bases and find reduced priced goods- so I got it for a little cheaper, around $11.00.

As far as electronic word of mouth goes, Gillette’s ads for the Fusion Pro-Glide can be found on many sites, such as YouTube or FaceBook. Especially the ad that I linked above can be spotted all over the internet. In conclusion, I recommend this particular razor. It is a dependable product that I assume most men that shave regularly are in the market for. Gillette does market exclusively for men, but it would be an adequate razor for women as well.

 

No responses yet

Sep 18 2014

Shopping Blog Post

Published by under The Shopping Blog

For my second shopping blog contribution, I’ve decided to talk about the razor I own: the Gillette Fusion Pro-Glide. It may seem somewhat corny to do a shopping blog post about a razor, but I remembered the idea being thrown out when we first discussed publishing the shopping blog posts. With that idea in mind, I realized a few aspects of Susan Strasser’s work were demonstrated with the Gillette example. For instance, Gillette seems to have a monopoly on non-disposable razors. Also, the advertising tactics of Gillette show that they are well aware of this fact. I would be willing to bet if asked, most people wouldn’t be able to name more than one brand of high-end razors other than Gillette. At least for male consumers.

The advertisement above is pretty common to see on TV.

Obviously, this product is fairly straightforward, and not nearly as interesting as my previous item. However, it does provide a pretty decent clean shave. I’m not a particularly beard-prone person, but I’ve used it at least every other day since I’ve gotten it. It runs for between $13.99-$14.99, so its a fairly affordable product considering the only real maintenance you may need would be to replace the batteries once they run out and clean it. If it were to completely break, replacing it by simply buying a new one is not that bad an option. That’s the benefit of manufacturing a good that is not terribly expensive and has decent longevity; it isn’t economically unbearable to replace. I bought it at the Commissary- the military supermarket that you can find on bases and find reduced priced goods- so I got it for a little cheaper, around $11.00.

As far as electronic word of mouth goes, Gillette’s ads for the Fusion Pro-Glide can be found on many sites, such as YouTube or FaceBook. Especially the ad that I linked above can be spotted all over the internet. In conclusion, I recommend this particular razor. It is a dependable product that I assume most men that shave regularly are in the market for. Gillette does market exclusively for men, but it would be an adequate razor for women as well.

 

No responses yet

Sep 18 2014

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

Published by under The Shopping Blog

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

The Poisonwood Bible is a book by one of my favorite authors. Barbara Kingsolver has written 14 books and I have read most of them. This one was a gift from my mother, and I admit that it didn’t hook me right away. The first few pages are excruciatingly slow and I picked it up and put it down several times. If it had been by any other author, I probably would have forgotten about it, but I kept going back to it and I finally made it past those first pages. From that point on I had a hard time putting it down.

Barbara Kingsolver writes both fiction and non-fiction. Her novels tend to be on the gritty, realistic side. The Poisonwood Bible is about a family that moves from Georgia to the Congo in the 1950’s so that the father can pursue his missionary work. It is narrated by the women of the family. Although all are white females, the experiences and perspectives of the mother and four daughters are varied and far reaching. Their dramatic story encompasses a range of issues from personal spirituality to global politics. The author did embed clear social and political messages in her story, which will undoubtedly turn off most readers not of like mind.

I like to pass books on to others, so my favorites are often not in my library. I gave this book away and have yet to replace it. We now have a number of formats in which to purchase texts, as well as a number of physical as well as virtual places to shop for them. Ultimately all this variety translates into a variety of prices. It is important to note that I want the actual book, not the ebook (available here at Amazon for $9.99) or the pdf (available here for free).

I would prefer to buy it new from an independent bookstore and support both the author and the smaller shops, however this will likely cost the most. Local options include Riverby Books and the Griffin Bookshop. I could not find The Poisonwood Bible on either’s website, however this online inventory for Riverby indicates they have another Kingsolver book, used softcover, for sale for $20.00. As much as I would like to support the smaller bookstores, it must be said that this is not a great deal. The most affordable option is usually to find it used online. A Google Shopping search for The Poisonwood Bible currently pulls up prices ranging from about $1.00 to $17.00. Typically, the used copies are cheaper and vice versa. A new copy from Barnes & Noble lands in between at $11.74. If I was on an extremely tight budget, I would go for the cheapest option [that includes positive customer reviews and a secure payment option]. If I was in a hurry, I would find a reasonably priced copy at a local chain store. Because I am on a budget but not in a hurry, I can look around for it at a used bookstore. I would hope to pay no more than $10.00 for a used softcover book, even at a small bookstore.

The electronic word of mouth (eWOM) can often be a response to the retailer as much as the item itself, so I looked at a variety of reviews. The reviews are mostly positive. On Barnes & Noble 700 ratings gave it 4.5/5 stars; on goodreads, just over 445,000 ratings averaged 3.98/5 stars. On every website, the majority of negative reviews criticize the book on political grounds.

An additional note of interest that I was not previously aware of, is the academic use of Barbara Kingsolver’s fiction. When I researched this book on the internet, I found that it has both Cliff Notes and sparknotes available.

No responses yet

Sep 18 2014

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

Published by under The Shopping Blog

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

The Poisonwood Bible is a book by one of my favorite authors. Barbara Kingsolver has written 14 books and I have read most of them. This one was a gift from my mother, and I admit that it didn’t hook me right away. The first few pages are excruciatingly slow and I picked it up and put it down several times. If it had been by any other author, I probably would have forgotten about it, but I kept going back to it and I finally made it past those first pages. From that point on I had a hard time putting it down.

Barbara Kingsolver writes both fiction and non-fiction. Her novels tend to be on the gritty, realistic side. The Poisonwood Bible is about a family that moves from Georgia to the Congo in the 1950’s so that the father can pursue his missionary work. It is narrated by the women of the family. Although all are white females, the experiences and perspectives of the mother and four daughters are varied and far reaching. Their dramatic story encompasses a range of issues from personal spirituality to global politics. The author did embed clear social and political messages in her story, which will undoubtedly turn off most readers not of like mind.

I like to pass books on to others, so my favorites are often not in my library. I gave this book away and have yet to replace it. We now have a number of formats in which to purchase texts, as well as a number of physical as well as virtual places to shop for them. Ultimately all this variety translates into a variety of prices. It is important to note that I want the actual book, not the ebook (available here at Amazon for $9.99) or the pdf (available here for free).

I would prefer to buy it new from an independent bookstore and support both the author and the smaller shops, however this will likely cost the most. Local options include Riverby Books and the Griffin Bookshop. I could not find The Poisonwood Bible on either's website, however this online inventory for Riverby indicates they have another Kingsolver book, used softcover, for sale for $20.00. As much as I would like to support the smaller bookstores, it must be said that this is not a great deal. The most affordable option is usually to find it used online. A Google Shopping search for The Poisonwood Bible currently pulls up prices ranging from about $1.00 to $17.00. Typically, the used copies are cheaper and vice versa. A new copy from Barnes & Noble lands in between at $11.74. If I was on an extremely tight budget, I would go for the cheapest option [that includes positive customer reviews and a secure payment option]. If I was in a hurry, I would find a reasonably priced copy at a local chain store. Because I am on a budget but not in a hurry, I can look around for it at a used bookstore. I would hope to pay no more than $10.00 for a used softcover book, even at a small bookstore.

The electronic word of mouth (eWOM) can often be a response to the retailer as much as the item itself, so I looked at a variety of reviews. The reviews are mostly positive. On Barnes & Noble 700 ratings gave it 4.5/5 stars; on goodreads, just over 445,000 ratings averaged 3.98/5 stars. On every website, the majority of negative reviews criticize the book on political grounds.

An additional note of interest that I was not previously aware of, is the academic use of Barbara Kingsolver’s fiction. When I researched this book on the internet, I found that it has both Cliff Notes and sparknotes available.

No responses yet

Sep 18 2014

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

Published by under The Shopping Blog

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

The Poisonwood Bible is a book by one of my favorite authors. Barbara Kingsolver has written 14 books and I have read most of them. This one was a gift from my mother, and I admit that it didn’t hook me right away. The first few pages are excruciatingly slow and I picked it up and put it down several times. If it had been by any other author, I probably would have forgotten about it, but I kept going back to it and I finally made it past those first pages. From that point on I had a hard time putting it down.

Barbara Kingsolver writes both fiction and non-fiction. Her novels tend to be on the gritty, realistic side. The Poisonwood Bible is about a family that moves from Georgia to the Congo in the 1950’s so that the father can pursue his missionary work. It is narrated by the women of the family. Although all are white females, the experiences and perspectives of the mother and four daughters are varied and far reaching. Their dramatic story encompasses a range of issues from personal spirituality to global politics. The author did embed clear social and political messages in her story, which will undoubtedly turn off most readers not of like mind.

I like to pass books on to others, so my favorites are often not in my library. I gave this book away and have yet to replace it. Naturally I have a plethora of options for buying my book. Tremendous transitions in the literary industry mean we now have a number of formats in which to purchase texts, as well as a number of physical as well as virtual places to shop for them. Ultimately this variety translates to a variety of prices. It is important to note that I want the actual book, not the ebook (available here at Amazon for $9.99) or the pdf (available here for free).

I would prefer to buy it new from an independent bookstore and support both the author and the smaller shops, however this will likely cost the most. Local options include Riverby Books and the Griffin Bookshop. I could not find The Poisonwood Bible at either, however this online inventory for Riverby indicates they have another Kingsolver book, used softcover, for sale for $20.00. As much as I would like to support the smaller bookstores, it must be said that this is not a great deal. The most affordable option is usually to find it used online. A Google Shopping search for The Poisonwood Bible currently pulls up prices ranging from about $1.00 to $17.00. Typically, the new copies are cheaper and vice versa. A new copy from Barnes & Noble lands in between at $11.74. If I was on an extremely tight budget, I would go for the cheapest option [that includes positive customer reviews and a secure payment option]. If I was in a hurry, I would find a reasonably priced copy at a local chain store. Because I am on a budget but not in a hurry, I can look around for it at a used bookstore. I would hope to pay no more than $10.00 for a used softcover book, even at a small bookstore.

The electronic word of mouth (eWOM) can often be a response to the retailer as much as the item itself, so I looked at a variety of reviews. The reviews are mostly positive. On Barnes & Noble 700 ratings gave it 4.5/5 stars; on goodreads, just over 445,000 ratings averaged 3.98/5 stars. On every website, the majority of negative reviews criticize the book on political grounds.

An additional note of interest that I was not previously aware of, is the academic use of Barbara Kingsolver’s fiction. When I researched this book on the internet, I found that it has both Cliff Notes and sparknotes available.

No responses yet

Sep 18 2014

Clothes for Climbers and much much more..

 

patagonia

 

If you don’t already own anything Patagonia, you’re missing out. Patagonia is a clothing company that is focused mainly on outdoor clothing. Since it was founded in 1970’s it has expanded its products to anything from jackets, to pants, hats, socks, wetsuits, backpacks and gear to even kids clothing. What makes Patagonia stand out from other outdoor clothing companies is its dedication to the environment. This company is a major contributor to environmental groups, for example donating 1% of its sales to environmental groups every year. They support and donate to countless eco-friendly groups and show that through the quality of their products.

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The item that I am choosing to share with you is the W’s Re-Tool Snap-T® Pullover. I received this as a Christmas gift last year after seeing so many people wear them around campus. This Patagonia that I own is gray and has pink edges, but it comes in a variety of colors such as white, blue, red, purple, green and so on. On the Patagonia website this item costs $119. Since I knew “Santa” wouldn’t spend that much money I searched elsewhere for it at a cheaper price. Online there are so many websites that sell this item at a lower price. I ordered mine from http://www.trekt.com/Category/776-Patagonia.aspx/1?gclid=CKy88ujI6cACFWho7AodllEANg , which is also an online outdoor clothing website. There they sell this item for as low as $71.40. There are many other Patagonia items that are sold there as well for much cheaper prices. Not only do they sell Patagonia online but they also sell Patagonia products in outdoors stores or sporting goods stores such as Dick’s ($119), Sports Authority, or Modells. I think that if someone was really interested in buying Patagonia products that they should first search online because there are so many websites such as www.amazon.com ($109) www.backcountry.com ($64), , www.zappos.com ($119), and www.rei.com  ($119).(these are only a few of the websites that carry Patagonia products.) I also believe that the Re-Tool Snap-T Pullover is a fairly popular item, so it can be found easily.

There are Patagonia retail stores all across the nation; the majority in California where it was founded. Aside from the retail stores in the United States, there are also retail stores in Italy, Japan, Australia, Ireland, Spain, France, Germany, Chile, Argentina, and more. Aside from searching for Patagonia retail stores, Patagonia’s website also provides all its online partners such as backcountry.com , rei.com, travelcountry.com, moosejaw.com, Nordstrom.com and more. Most importantly you don’t need to go to a retail store to buy a Patagonia because you can find them in any outdoor or sporting goods store or website.

Founded by a climber himself (hence my title “Clothes for Climbers”), Yvon Chouinard first began by making climbing gear and hardware. By 1970 Chouinard Equipment became the largest supplier of climbing gear in the United States. However, his equipment was extremely damaging to the rocks. This was his first big environmental step. After finding an alternative to hammering pitons (aluminum), this ever-growing company expanded into the clothing industry and now takes pride in creating clothing of organic cotton and environmentally friendly fabrics (after years of trial and error).

In terms of eWOM, many of those who chose to write reviews talked about how they decided to “splurge” on this item and as a result were happy that they did. Various people commented on how soft and comfortable their pullover was and how they loved the vibrant colors that were offered. Aside from the look and feel of it, owners of this item said they wear it when it is “chilly” out or even after working out. Overall, the quality of this item is high and many people have commented on how often they wear it. I also follow Patagonia on Instagram where they post images of their products along with pictures of their team members hiking, surfing, and climbing. Through their Instagram it is obvious that they are very focused on the community and “closeness” of their company. Aside from pictures of their products, ambassadors and scenic images they also post promoting their dedication to environmentalism.

I chose to post this item because it is part of my wardrobe that I wear constantly once it gets colder out and because it is a product of high quality that anyone could be happy purchasing.  Personally, I love the look and feel of it. This item specifically could appeal to anyone in his or her teenage years and beyond. There are both men’s and women’s pullovers along with variations of this product that would satisfy anyone looking for a high quality outdoor clothing item. Not only would I recommend the Retool Pullover Snap-T, but I would also recommend any Patagonia products because of their quality and dedication to something bigger than their company, such as the environment.

http://www.patagonia.com/us/home

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Sep 12 2014

Shopping Blog

Published by under The Shopping Blog

The Laguna LE300

This beautiful guitar pictured above is the Laguna LE300. I purchased mine from my local GuitarCenter in Arlington about three years ago now. The model that I bought is the exact same as the one pictured above. It is characterized by its Antique Vintage Burst finish with a 22-fret Rosewood fret-board. On it, the frets have centrally placed abalone inlays and the pickup configuration is humbucker/single coil/single coil (Custom Alnicos). The pickup selector is 5-way. The body of the Laguna LE300 is made out of carved swamp ash, while the one-piece neck is produced out of hard-rock maple.

Linked above is a video of jazz fusion guitarist Greg Howe talking about the Laguna LE300 model. Greg Howe is an influence to me as a guitarist because his technique is outstanding yet his style is smooth and fluid. When I first started playing guitar about five or six years ago, I discovered him and was immediately impressed. Below is a quick video of him improvising to a backing track named “Bird’s Eye View”. Notice the guitar is an ESP; this is before he became sponsored by Laguna.

The Laguna LE300 can be purchased at any GuitarCenter, although they may not always be on stock. As for smaller music stores, it’s hit or miss. Laguna is not as well-known a manufacturer as Gibson, Fender or Ibanez; thus, their stock is less likely to be available at local music stores. Another place where they can be found quite readily, however, is the internet. Online music stores such as Musician’s Friend have a large inventory of all musical instruments and companies imaginable. While I purchased mine used at my local GuitarCenter, I’ve used those online marketplaces in the past as well.

As this model is a few years old, the prices have gone down. It is a high-quality guitar available for a very reasonable price. I paid around $330 (gently used) in 2011 when I bought it. A quick Google search showed me that it the general price range is between $349.99-$369.99. This means the model is in fact quite affordable, especially compared with other Lagunas which tend to be on the pricier side. I didn’t find out about this guitar through the internet, rather I spotted it at the GuitarCenter when I was shopping around and really liked it the look of it. It also reminded me of Greg Howe and how he plays Laguna guitars- I wanted to have a guitar that had that smooth, warm sound as well.

I really like this guitar. It’s my second guitar, my first being an Ibanez RG652. I prefer it to the Ibanez, as it just has a more graceful appearance and a gentler sound. It’s the perfect guitar for jazz or blues, although if you crank up the distortion you can get good rock or metal sounds from it as well. I prefer the neck pickup (the single coil) when I play it because it accentuates the low ends more than the clangier bridge humbucker. When I play, I normally use mild distortion with some delay to get that sound that I really like.

No responses yet

Sep 12 2014

Shopping Blog

Published by under The Shopping Blog

The Laguna LE300

This beautiful guitar pictured above is the Laguna LE300. I purchased mine from my local GuitarCenter in Arlington about three years ago now. The model that I bought is the exact same as the one pictured above. It is characterized by its Antique Vintage Burst finish with a 22-fret Rosewood fret-board. On it, the frets have centrally placed abalone inlays and the pickup configuration is humbucker/single coil/single coil (Custom Alnicos). The pickup selector is 5-way. The body of the Laguna LE300 is made out of carved swamp ash, while the one-piece neck is produced out of hard-rock maple.

Linked above is a video of jazz fusion guitarist Greg Howe talking about the Laguna LE300 model. Greg Howe is an influence to me as a guitarist because his technique is outstanding yet his style is smooth and fluid. When I first started playing guitar about five or six years ago, I discovered him and was immediately impressed. Below is a quick video of him improvising to a backing track named “Bird’s Eye View”. Notice the guitar is an ESP; this is before he became sponsored by Laguna.

The Laguna LE300 can be purchased at any GuitarCenter, although they may not always be on stock. As for smaller music stores, it’s hit or miss. Laguna is not as well-known a manufacturer as Gibson, Fender or Ibanez; thus, their stock is less likely to be available at local music stores. Another place where they can be found quite readily, however, is the internet. Online music stores such as Musician’s Friend have a large inventory of all musical instruments and companies imaginable. While I purchased mine used at my local GuitarCenter, I’ve used those online marketplaces in the past as well.

As this model is a few years old, the prices have gone down. It is a high-quality guitar available for a very reasonable price. I paid around $330 (gently used) in 2011 when I bought it. A quick Google search showed me that it the general price range is between $349.99-$369.99. This means the model is in fact quite affordable, especially compared with other Lagunas which tend to be on the pricier side. I didn’t find out about this guitar through the internet, rather I spotted it at the GuitarCenter when I was shopping around and really liked it the look of it. It also reminded me of Greg Howe and how he plays Laguna guitars- I wanted to have a guitar that had that smooth, warm sound as well.

I really like this guitar. It’s my second guitar, my first being an Ibanez RG652. I prefer it to the Ibanez, as it just has a more graceful appearance and a gentler sound. It’s the perfect guitar for jazz or blues, although if you crank up the distortion you can get good rock or metal sounds from it as well. I prefer the neck pickup (the single coil) when I play it because it accentuates the low ends more than the clangier bridge humbucker. When I play, I normally use mild distortion with some delay to get that sound that I really like.

No responses yet

Sep 11 2014

Kiel James Patrick and Sarah Vickers: Classy Girls Blog

Published by under The Shopping Blog

I never appreciated, or missed New England when traveling, until I left. My hometown of Sandy Hook, Conn., was unheard of before December 2012′s tragedy, and since then it’s been practically restored to it’s unexciting state. Sandy Hook served as a perfect community to grow up in, though my family and I spent a lot of time visiting Cape Cod, Newport, or Okemo Mtn., VT. When I realized that I would be leaving the area and spending my collegiate years in Virginia at UMW, I knew I had to have something to keep home closer.

Franny Glass bracelet from KJP's Cape and Brighton Beach line

Franny Glass bracelet from KJP’s Cape and Brighton Beach line – $40.00

Enter Kiel James Patrick, a classic New England bracelet and accessory maker who’s fame peaked just in time for me to start touring colleges. I could wear t-shirts from The Black Dog or Vineyard Vines (Martha’s Vineyard), stick SKI VERMONT bumper stickers on everything I own, and default to my Bean Boots when I really missed home. But I wanted something more subtle for my time in the south, and Kiel’s bracelets were exactly what I “needed.” The first one I received was a gift from my father, heightening the sentimental value. He chose the Franny Glass bracelet from KJP’s Cape and Brighton Beach.

Kiel’s works also include traditional knot bracelets with his iconic anchor latch, a very small collection of men’s button down shirts, belts, and neck/bow ties. Bracelets run anywhere from $35.00-$68.00, a fair price considering their originality is unmatched by rival New England accessory lines (that’s you, Lemon & Line, The Black Dog, and even Vineyard Vines). In terms of pricing, the only rival brand less expensive is Lemon & Line, with bracelets at a blanket price of $25.00. But these less expensive accessories are harder to find, as KJP covers the New England market. Small boutiques (Darien Sports Shop) and small chains (In The Pink, Island Outfitters) throughout New England are optimal places to purchase KJP products. Across the East coast,they can be found in the likes of Hilton Head, SC, Wilmington, NC, and Saratoga Springs, NY. Internationally, they can be found in a handful of stores in places as far as Rome.

Kiel, who’s branded himself as “KJP,” does an outstanding job when it comes to communication with his followers. He and fiancé Sarah Vickers, who has her own headband and earring line, galavant throughout New England to meet shoppers. They boast active twitter, instagram, and tumblr accounts, and take every opportunity to showcase their picturesque lives. For more text heavy posts and collaboration announcements (the couple has worked with shops like Royal Male), they each have their own blogs. Sarah’s is Classy Girls Wear Pearls, which inspired my own post title. Their relationships with fans only boost their electronic word of mouth; upon meeting my friend at In The Pink Boutique on Martha’s Vineyard, they helped her record a Happy Birthday video for me! They can frequently be seen interacting with their followers online and in person, always sharing where they bought aspects of their wardrobes and inspirations behind their designs. Lastly, their team of summer interns boast their own social media accounts, allowing the rest of us to almost participate in their exciting lives.

Kiel James Patrick and fiancé Sarah Vickers break from the 2014 Tory Burch show in front of the Pulitzer Fountain (NYC).

 

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Sep 08 2014

Strasser Reflection Post

Published by under Uncategorized

The first segment of Susan Strasser’s book “Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass Market” describes how American brand capitalism evolved throughout the twentieth century. An example of a change in the market is the baking grease product Crisco and how it was first marketed to the public. First developed in 1912, manufacturer Proctor & Gamble stressed the fact that this was a breakthrough product, something ‘new’ that everyone needed. Strasser argues that this marketing tactic was synonymous with the way American capitalism has evolved into a brand-name centered hub of corporate consumerism. In this way, manufacturers realized they could manipulate demand by using aggressive marketing techniques to lure consumers into purchasing their products. The implications of this, Strasser argues, is that the American marketplace has turned into a sphere that is very focused on expensive brand names. From the manufacturer’s point of view, the primary concern was and still is not necessarily to fulfill specific needs of buyers, but rather to capture the market and reap profits. This so far has been an interesting book to read and I’m curious what the rest of the Strasser’s work has in store.

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